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  An American Manifesto
Wednesday December 17, 2014 
by Christopher Chantrill Follow chrischantrill on Twitter

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MIDDLE CLASS

Contents

Chapter 1

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Chapter 4

Chapter 5

Chapter 6

Chapter 7

Chapter 8

Chapter 9

Chapter 10

Chapter 11

Chapter 12

Chapter 13

Chapter 14

Chapter 15

Bibliography

Chapter 6:
Popular Religion in the Nineteenth Century

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The growth of the Mormons has been rapid and steady.  Starting from Joseph Smith’s “holy family” of 23 in the 1830, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints grew by the end of the nineteenth century to over 200,000 adherents, an average annual growth of 17 percent.  A century later, it had about ten million members.

Of course, all this was merely bagatelle.  More than the nineteenth century, it was the twentieth century was the great age of popular religion.  In 1906 a Christian sect was founded in Los Angeles, California, that grew to half a billion worldwide by the turn of the twenty-first century. 

In any century popular religion, its colorful leaders and its millions of adherents, is a world outside the interest of our modern elites.  The reason is not difficult to discover.  People engage with popular religion as part of a self-governed struggle to achieve a competence and respectability in the city, to negotiate the transition from country ways to city ways.  To the sons and daughters of the bourgeoisie in the nineteenth century, its earnestness and its enthusiasm is slightly embarrassing and shameful, its reverence for the family and its dutiful roles is confining, and its experience of salvation from sin inexplicable.  But as this same religion flourishes in the favelas of Latin America, in the chaotic nations of southern Africa, and in the burgeoning giants of East Asia, the observer is bound to admit that there is something between enthusiastic Christianity and emerging capitalism that makes them eager partners.


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 TAGS


Action

The incentive that impels a man to act is always some uneasiness... But to make a man act [he must have] the expectation that purposeful behavior has the power to remove or at least to alleviate the felt uneasiness.
Ludwig von Mises, Human Action


Chappies

“But I saw a man yesterday who knows a fellow who had it from a chappie that said that Urquhart had been dipping himself a bit recklessly off the deep end.”  —Freddy Arbuthnot
Dorothy L. Sayers, Strong Poison


China and Christianity

At first, we thought [the power of the West] was because you had more powerful guns than we had. Then we thought it was because you had the best political system. Next we focused on your economic system. But in the past twenty years, we have realized that the heart of your culture is your religion: Christianity.
David Aikman, Jesus in Beijing


Churches

[In the] higher Christian churches... they saunter through the liturgy like Mohawks along a string of scaffolding who have long since forgotten their danger. If God were to blast such a service to bits, the congregation would be, I believe, genuinely shocked. But in the low churches you expect it every minute.
Annie Dillard, Holy the Firm


Civil Society

“Civil Society”—a complex welter of intermediate institutions, including businesses, voluntary associations, educational institutions, clubs, unions, media, charities, and churches—builds, in turn, on the family, the primary instrument by which people are socialized into their culture and given the skills that allow them to live in broader society and through which the values and knowledge of that society are transmitted across the generations.
Francis Fukuyama, Trust


Class War

In England there were always two sharply opposed middle classes, the academic middle class and the commercial middle class. In the nineteenth century, the academic middle class won the battle for power and status... Then came the triumph of Margaret Thatcher... The academics lost their power and prestige and... have been gloomy ever since.
Freeman Dyson, “The Scientist as Rebel”


Conservatism

Conservatism is the philosophy of society. Its ethic is fraternity and its characteristic is authority — the non-coercive social persuasion which operates in a family or a community. It says ‘we should...’.
Danny Kruger, On Fraternity


Conservatism's Holy Grail

What distinguishes true Conservatism from the rest, and from the Blair project, is the belief in more personal freedom and more market freedom, along with less state intervention... The true Third Way is the Holy Grail of Tory politics today - compassion and community without compulsion.
Minette Marrin, The Daily Telegraph


Conversion

“When we received Christ,” Phil added, “all of a sudden we now had a rule book to go by, and when we had problems the preacher was right there to give us the answers.”
James M. Ault, Jr., Spirit and Flesh


Democratic Capitalism

I mean three systems in one: a predominantly market economy; a polity respectful of the rights of the individual to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; and a system of cultural institutions moved by ideals of liberty and justice for all. In short, three dynamic and converging systems functioning as one: a democratic polity, an economy based on markets and incentives, and a moral-cultural system which is plural and, in the largest sense, liberal.
Michael Novak, The Spirit of Democratic Capitalism


 

©2007 Christopher Chantrill