home  |  book  |  blogs  |   RSS  |  contact  |
  An American Manifesto
Thursday September 3, 2015 
by Christopher Chantrill Follow chrischantrill on Twitter

TOP NAV

Home

Blogs

Opeds

Articles

Bio

Contact

SISTERS

1930s analysis

UK spending

US bailout

US gov debt

US budget

US revenue

US spending

sisters, sisters

BOOK

Manifesto

Sample

Faith

Education

Mutual aid

Law

Books

CHAPPIES

All

Beck/Graves

Hayek

Mises

Northrop

Novak

Paglia

Stark

Turner

Voegelin

Wilber

JV CHAPPIES

Beito

Boyd

Green

CHAPTERS

Chapter 1

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Chapter 4

Chapter 5

Chapter 6

Chapter 7

Chapter 8

Chapter 9

Chapter 10

Chapter 11

Chapter 12

Chapter 13

Chapter 14

Chapter 15

Energy Calculator

 BLOG

"Doug's" Version of Derb's "Cold Civil War"

OK. So I was clicking back on a series of links from Dear Old Derb -- John Derbyshire to you -- on his "Cold Civil War" meme. And he quoted this piece from a comment by "Doug" at EconLog :

Let`s say you were to immigrate to a new country which is essentially divided between two hostile tribes engaged in perpetual low-intensity warfare. We`ll call them Hutus and Tutsis. You have no previous allegiance or affiliation with either tribe.
Let`s also say that one tribe, Tutsis, holds a hegemony on all organs of education and opinion, virtually the entire government bureaucracy and all of popular culture. Many of the most prestigious institutions in the country consist of 95%+ Tutsis. Tutsi organizations like “Harvard University” and “The New York Times” are widely respected by even ardent Hutus.
Now of course there are Hutu organizations and no shortage of powerful Hutu people. But, unlike the reverse, there are virtually no prestigious institutions where Tutsis are excluded. I.e. some prestigious and powerful institutions, like “General Electric” or “Goldman Sachs” may be 2:1 Hutu at most. But any with a 10:1 ratio or more are virtually guaranteed to be far inferior, second-rate and low status institutions or organizations. Examples of these pariahs are “Oral Roberts University”, “Fox News” and “Amway.”
This leads to a strange asymmetry where it is certainly possible to succeed in this society while being Hutu, it almost never hurts to be Tutsi. For example just the other day there was a Tutsi ceremony called “The Academy Awards” that almost exclusively honors Tutsis. Despite this, this ceremony is observed and recognized by Hutus around the country.
A rational, self-interested immigrant to this society would of course choose align himself as a moderate, but reliably loyal Tutsi. Unless you`re a Tutsi extremist, leaning Tutsi will almost never hurt your career or standing except in all but the most malformed, backwards and irrelevant Hutu organizations.
But failure to demonstrate at least general sympathy to the Tutsi side will almost undoubtedly lock you out of many career options and generally draw attention to you in most corners of polite society.
Oy. And Oy. When you read that you think to yourself: why do  I bother? Why belong to the Out group when the scales are so decidedly set in favor of the Ins? Why not just chuck it in and join the progressive ruling class.

OK. There was one thing that is almost encouraging. Doug points out that the "rational, self-interested immigrant" notices that the institutions that are 95% Tutsu are often highly successful places like "Harvard University" whereas institutions that are 95% Hutu are often places like "Oral Roberts University" or "Fox News." Why would you want to associate with Hutus?

But you know what? I think that the 95% game is a mistake. Because the 95% institutions are becoming stupider over time. That will happen to you when you shut yourself up away from the push and shove of opposing ideas. It's better to live in the open-outcry world and deal with the opposition mano-a-mano. You know what I mean: inbreeding; Hapburg lip, etc.

Having said that, the question remains. Why would any discerning immigrant align with the Hutus? In Sean Trende's handy election calculator we get the 2012 presidential election results as: Blacks: 94% Dem; Hispanics: 72% Dem; Asians: 68% Dem.

What is wrong with these people? Why don't they all vote 94% Dem like the African Americans?

I suppose the answer is that the advantage of identifying Tutsi only applies if you are a top-level ruling class type or if you are a client of the welfare state on benefits. And so about 30% of Hispanics and Asians voted for the GOP in 2012, because, well because they actually believe in truth, justice, and the American Way, even if it doesn't pay. There will, of course, be more of them in 2016.


perm | comment | Follow chrischantrill on Twitter | 09/03/15 12:12 pm ET


Will #BlackLivesMatter Split Blacks in 2016?

I get the Black Lives Matter movement. Back in 2009 African Americans thought they had gone to heaven. Something had happened that they never thought that they would see in their lifetimes. A racist America had elected its First Black President. Unfortunately, nothing has changed. African Americans kids still do badly at lousy urban schools. 70+ percent of black babies are still born out of ...

 click for more


perm | comment | Follow chrischantrill on Twitter | 09/02/15 12:34 pm ET


You Can't "End the Fed" Unless You "End Big Government"

COUNT me as a critic of the Federal Reserve System. So I should be encouraged by the recent Jackson Hole Summit held by critics of the Fed at the to coincide with the Kansas City Fed's traditional August symposium at Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Here's John Fund in National Review.  A growing number of people believe the Federal Reserve has hurt rather than helped the recovery. It has pursued ...

 click for more


perm | comment | Follow chrischantrill on Twitter | 09/01/15 11:34 am ET


NYT Readers Aren't Buying Trump

CONSERVATIVE pundits at the New York Times like Ross Douthat and David Brooks have a delicate task. They are talking to people that live in a liberal echo chamber, hearing nothing but Democratic talking points all day long, from the New York Times and from NPR and from all their liberal friends. They have to introduce conservative themes very carefully, otherwise they'll lose their readers at ...

 click for more


perm | comment | Follow chrischantrill on Twitter | 08/31/15 12:36 pm ET


Why Politics is Always About Looting and Plunder

IN the era when progressive minds were concerned about the power of the absolute monarchs the word on the street was "limited government." Progressive minds realized that the absolute monarchs, like the feudal monarchs before them, maintained themselves in power by distributing favors to their supporters. That was insupportable, according to reason and natural law.

That lasted for about 100 years, from 1750 to 1850.

But once the absolute monarchs had been dispatched to the dustbin of history progressive minds forgot all about limited government. Now they saw themselves as the rising ruling class and developed a politics where they would replace the monarch and win political power for themselves by offering favors to their supporters. So much was obvious to the best minds. And it was all discernible from the march of history and from social justice.

Of course, the truth is that politics has always been about loot and plunder. It was about loot and plunder when the hunter gatherers conducted their dawn raids on the neighboring tribe, killing the men and taking the women into slavery. It was about loot and plunder when Agamemnon and his pals including Odysseus, sacker of cities, besieged and sacked the city of Troy. It was about loot and plunder when the Roman legions ranged through Europe and the Middle East. It was about loot and plunder when Europeans discovered America and took the silver from Bolivia and the land from the North American Indians.

The formula is simple. A would-be political leader -- we might call him a freebooter or a buccaneer -- recruits an army with the promise of loot and plunder. We might call these followers freeloaders. If successful, this leader takes political power over some territory and taxes and regulates the people therein to benefit his supporters.

For that brief century from 1750 to 1850 the idea got about that maybe the loot and plunder idea was not such a good plan for government. Because, after all, loot and plunder are destructive. They sweep away productive economic relations and strip people of their wealth. And give it to people whose only talent is military or political soldiering. So the idea got about that government, the agency of looting and pillaging, ought to be limited, so that wealth could increase and benefit everyone.

But in the middle of the 19th century, as we have seen, a new idea got about. The educated sons of the bourgeoisie, shocked by the squalor of the industrial slums, intuited a new society in which all the squalor would be gone and society would become truly social and cooperative, rather than hierarchical and exploitative.

But there was one little problem with their ideas. How would we get from here to there? The answer was as old as the hills. We would get there by recruiting a political army with promises of loot and plunder: bigger wages, less working hours, free education, old-age pensions, health care.

It did not seem to occur to these people -- it still does not occur to their political descendants -- that a political movement based on loot and plunder will end up 100 years later as government based on loot and plunder. And what does loot and plunder do? It strips the land and the people of their wealth and their livelihood.

The trouble with socialism, according to Margaret Thatcher, is that in the end you run out of other peoples' money. It's easy to see why. The nature of the political game is that you must come to each election with a new promise of loot. That is what you have taught your supporters down the decades and that is what they demand. That was why President Obama had to lie about Obamacare and pretend it would lower health insurance premiums, and why Hillary Clinton has to conjure up brain-dead ideas to complicate the capital gains tax to make it look as though she is shaking new money out of the trees that can be spent on her supporters.

In the end the politicians over-promise on the loot. In the end you run out of other peoples' money. In the end you get Greece or Argentina.

So the solution is pretty obvious. You replace the current system with a system of limited government, where the politicians do not rally support by offering free stuff.

After all, any sensible voter should be able to see that in the end the government runs out of money to pay its pensions, so the practical thing to do is to make sure that your life is not dependent upon the continued payment of a government pension. On that view the idea of paying payroll taxes for 40 years on the faith that the government will pay the pensions it promised seems close to certifiable delusion.

But that is the system we live under. Until we don't.


perm | comment | Follow chrischantrill on Twitter | 07/31/15 10:33 am ET


The #cuckservative Meme

I get it. Conservative leadership, from Mitch McConnell (R-KY) in the Senate and John Boehner (R-OH) in the House to the mainstream conservative media is disappointingly wimpy. You might even say that they had been cuckolded by the shameless hussies in LiberalLand who have been cheating on them for decades. Thus #cuckservatives. When are they going to do something about it? And act like real ...

 click for more


perm | comment | Follow chrischantrill on Twitter | 07/30/15 10:51 am ET


How to Talk to Your Liberal Women Friends

I'M going to be lunching with my liberal women friends in the next week or so. We are talking about the kind of woman that will be on board for the idea that it's time for America's First Woman President. Here I am, aching with sorrow about the way that America's government has failed its people, because of the faith of its ruling class in its top-down paternalism, and your average educated ...

 click for more


perm | comment | Follow chrischantrill on Twitter | 07/29/15 10:41 am ET


It Must Be The Greedy Bankers, Otherwise...

I just had an epiphany on the Blame the Bankers meme that every Democrat and every liberal instinctively believes as the cause of the Crash of 2008. I'd always assumed that it was pure cynical political blame-shifting, the natural instinct of the ruling class to find a scapegoat to take the blame for its feckless and foolishness. Of course, that's what it was, mostly. You can't run a country ...

 click for more


perm | comment | Follow chrischantrill on Twitter | 07/28/15 9:51 am ET


|  September blogs  |  August blogs  |

 FEATURED:

“I Want a President”

Georg Simmel’s Sociology

Charles Murray’s By The People

Thomas Piketty’s Capital

The Spirit Level

McCloskey’s “Bourgeois Era”

 OPED


Medicare Advantage is Taking Over the World

EVERYONE KNOWS that Medicare is going to eat the budget. But last week the Medicare Trustees issued their annual Medicare Trustees Report and they said that costs are increasing slower than expected. They have a point. Medicare has been chugging along at 3 percent ...

more | 07/27/15


Why Ta-Nehisi Coates is in the Same Game as the Chattanooga Shooter


Warning: strpos(): Offset not contained in string in /home/rmc/public_html/navigation.php on line 93
I ...

more | 07/20/15


The WHINOs and the RINOs Should Be Friends

It Isn't Roberts' Problem: It's Ours

Why is the Democratic Party So Disciplined?

Opeds


 RMC CHAPTER-A-DAY


RMC Contents
Chapter 1: After the Welfare State
Chapter 2: Down in South Carolina and Out in Brooklyn
Chapter 3: Awakenings of Monotheism
Chapter 4: The Nineteenth Century From the Top Down

THE GREAT EVENT of the second millennium was the rise of the world-historical middle class.... more


Chapter 5: The Nineteenth Century From the Bottom Up
Chapter 6: Popular Religion in the Nineteenth Century

 RMC BOOKS


RMC Book of the Day

Graña, César, Bohemian versus Bourgeois


RMC Books on Education

Andrew Coulson, Market Education
How universal literacy was achieved before government education

Carl Kaestle, Pillars of the Republic
How we got our education system

James Tooley, Reclaiming Education
How only a market in education will provide opportunity for the poor

James Tooley, The Miseducation of Women
How the feminists wrecked education for boys and for girls

E.G. West, Education and the State
How education was doing fine before the government muscled in


RMC Books on Law

Hernando De Soto, The Mystery of Capital
How ordinary people in the United States wrote the law during the 19th century

F. A. Hayek, Law Legislation and Liberty, Vol 1
How to build a society based upon law

Henry Maine, Ancient Law
How the movement of progressive peoples is from status to contract

John Zane, The Story of Law
How law developed from early times down to the present


RMC Books on Mutual Aid

James Bartholomew, The Welfare State We're In
How the welfare state makes crime, education, families, and health care worse.

David Beito, From Mutual Aid to the Welfare State
How ordinary people built a sturdy social safety net in the 19th century

David Green, Before Beveridge: Welfare Before the Welfare State
How ordinary people built themselves a sturdy safety net before the welfare state

Theda Skocpol, Diminished Democracy
How the US used to thrive under membership associations and could do again

David Stevenson, The Origins of Freemasonry
How modern freemasonry got started in Scotland


RMC Books on Religion

David Aikman, Jesus in Beijing
How Christianity is booming in China

Finke & Stark, The Churching of America, 1776-1990
How the United States grew into a religious nation

Robert William Fogel, The Fourth Great Awakening and the Future of Egalitarianism
How progressives must act fast if they want to save the welfare state

David Martin, Pentecostalism: The World Their Parish
How Pentecostalism is spreading across the world


 READINGS:

Donald Trump, Traitor to His Class
Ross Douthat, but check the knee-jerk commenters

Startups Vie to Build an Uber for Health Care
but they don't accept insurance.

Demographics and the 2016 Election Scenarios
Sean Trende's 2016 election calculator.

Hillary Clinton Proposes Debt-Free Tuition at Public Colleges
The solution to a too-expensive education system is more expense.

A revolt is taking place against the "ruling class"
But Bob Reich doesn't think to include professors as members of the ruling class.

> archive

 CCWUD PROJECT

cruel . corrupt . wasteful
unjust . deluded


 


Take the Test!

 THE PROJECT

Work to restore the Road to the Middle Class. Here’s how. Ground it in faith. Grade it with education. Protect it with mutual aid. Defend it with the law. more>>

 THE ARGUMENT

The Road to the Middle Class is a journey from a world of power to a world of trust and love. In religion, it is a journey from power gods that respond to sacrifice and augury to the God who makes a covenant with mankind. In education, it is a journey from the world of the spoken word to the world of the written word. In community, it is the journey from dependence on blood kin and upon clientage under a great lord to the mutual aid and the rules of the self-governing fraternal association. In law it is the journey from the violence of force and feud to the kingŽs peace, the law of contract, and private property.


 TAGS


What Liberals Think About Conservatives

[W]hen I asked a liberal longtime editor I know with a mainstream [publishing] house for a candid, shorthand version of the assumptions she and her colleagues make about conservatives, she didn't hesitate. “Racist, sexist, homophobic, anti-choice fascists,” she offered, smiling but meaning it.
Harry Stein, I Can't Believe I'm Sitting Next to a Republican


US Life in 1842

Families helped each other putting up homes and barns. Together, they built churches, schools, and common civic buildings. They collaborated to build roads and bridges. They took pride in being free persons, independent, and self-reliant; but the texture of their lives was cooperative and fraternal.
Michael Novak, The Spirit of Democratic Capitalism


Taking Responsibility

[To make] of each individual member of the army a soldier who, in character, capability, and knowledge, is self-reliant, self-confident, dedicated, and joyful in taking responsibility [verantwortungsfreudig] as a man and a soldier. — Gen. Hans von Seeckt
MacGregor Knox, Williamson Murray, ed., The dynamics of military revolution, 1300-2050


Society and State

For [the left] there is only the state and the individual, nothing in between. No family to rely on, no friend to depend on, no community to call on. No neighbourhood to grow in, no faith to share in, no charities to work in. No-one but the Minister, nowhere but Whitehall, no such thing as society - just them, and their laws, and their rules, and their arrogance.
David Cameron, Conference Speech 2008


Socialism equals Animism

Imagining that all order is the result of design, socialists conclude that order must be improvable by better design of some superior mind.
F.A. Hayek, The Fatal Conceit


Sacrifice

[Every] sacrifice is an act of impurity that pays for a prior act of greater impurity... without its participants having to suffer the full consequences incurred by its predecessor. The punishment is commuted in a process that strangely combines and finesses the deep contradiction between justice and mercy.
Frederick Turner, Beauty: The Value of Values


Responsible Self

[The Axial Age] highlights the conception of a responsible self... [that] promise[s] man for the first time that he can understand the fundamental structure of reality and through salvation participate actively in it.
Robert N Bellah, "Religious Evolution", American Sociological Review, Vol. 29, No. 3.


 

©2014 Christopher Chantrill

mysql close 0