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Friday September 19, 2014 
by Christopher Chantrill Follow chrischantrill on Twitter

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Obama's Togetherness Roberts Hands a Poisoned Chalice to the President

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The Ghosts of Liberal Pieties

by Christopher Chantrill
June 26, 2012 at 6:00 pm

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THESE LAST few months I’ve been working on the idea that there are two modern world views. There’s the Invisible Hand world view that things will work out because humans are social animals and must be social to achieve their selfish ends.

Then there is the Exploitation world view that says that the only way forward is for idealistic activists to fight for the people’s rights against a world of wealthy corporations and greedy bankers.

Imagine what I learned from the tour guide when I went on a cemetery walking tour recently on Queen Anne hill in liberal Seattle.

Over here is the grave of Carlos Bulosan, the Filipino-American writer and activist who penned the “Freedom from Want” essay in the Saturday Evening Post in 1943.

But we are not really free unless we use what we produce. So long as the fruit of our labor is denied us, so long will want manifest itself in a world of slaves.

Get it? It’s the Marxian theory of surplus value. Over here lies an African American woman who organized the first African-American college sorority at Howard University. Over there is a woman who was the first teacher in Seattle (at a private school, unfortunately). In 1848 she attended the Seneca Falls Convention on women’s rights.

Over here are the victims of the 1916 Everett Massacre when IWW supporters took a boat from Seattle to hold a rally in support of striking shingle workers. On landing in Everett they ran into hail of fire from the sheriff and a posse of vigilantes: just because the Wobblies wanted the bosses to share the profits. And here are graves of typographical union workers that died from tuberculosis.

Here’s the grave of Seattle banker Rudolph Ankeny. In 1891 he cut down a huge cedar, used by the local tribes and revered as a “signal tree,” and built a house in its place. Here’s the founder of Hansen Baking Company. He started out as a cleaner in a Seattle bakery, then learned the trade, worked his way up and bought the business. Eventually he sold out to an eastern conglomerate and the business folded.

OK, enough of the liberal history; let’s indulge in a little conservative truth-telling.

In the 1940s, when Bulosan was writing his screed, workers were enjoying the fruits of 100 years of industrialism, rising from incomes of $1-3 per day in 1800 to about $30 per day. What an amazing achievement! The 1848 convention in Seneca Falls, New York, was possible because in 1841 the railroad had reached the city. For the first time in history well-born young women could travel to the Finger Lakes inexpensively in comfort and safety to discuss the need, in the industrial age, to change the traditions of property ownership and inheritance more appropriate for an agricultural age. How great is that? In the lumber town of Everett, Washington, 1916 was a year of serious depression: not too much in the way of corporate profits to share with the Wobblies.

Let’s finish with Rudolph Ankeny, the tree-cutting banker. He came to Seattle in 1888 to work as a bookkeeper at Puget Sound National Bank, was promoted to teller in 1890 and assistant cashier a year later when he built his house. Not exactly the CEO of Goldman Sachs.

One of the problems of living in a closed community and holding regular religious services to celebrate the saints and martyrs in local cemeteries is that you blind yourself to glaring injustices staring you right in the face. So the Pew Research Center’s Trends in American Values 1987-2012 is full of responses to questions about the social safety net and the environment. But none of those liberals thinks to ask a question on generational injustice.

Now, if I were a visitor from Mars, the first thing I would notice is that our society spends trillions of dollars on seniors like me while fobbing off young people with a lousy education that confines them in government child custodial facilities for two decades, saddles them with gigantic debt that cannot be discharged in bankruptcy, and then tosses them out into a job market with no jobs. If I were a young person today I’d be crying out to the reverberate hills for justice.

On the Invisible Hand world view there is certainly recognition that the industrial economy can and does cause suffering and exploitation. But it takes the Exploitation world view to gin up genuine injustice, Fidel. Typically the ruling class has no idea what is wrong. It is too busy congratulating itself for its heroic fight against injustice a century ago.

That is not to say our liberal friends are evil people. It’s just that when they fill up their minds with heartwarming tales from the modern Foxe’s Book of Liberal Martyrs, they might be missing something.

They might be missing the determination of this “Empowered Man” answering the prayers of President James Madison by bravely holding up the US Constitution and speaking truth to power in front of the White House--to the horror of President Obama and the applause of the good guys: Presidents Lincoln, Reagan, Washington and Coolidge.

Christopher Chantrill blogs at www.roadtothemiddleclass.com.

Buy his Road to the Middle Class.

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 TAGS


Chappies

“But I saw a man yesterday who knows a fellow who had it from a chappie that said that Urquhart had been dipping himself a bit recklessly off the deep end.”  —Freddy Arbuthnot
Dorothy L. Sayers, Strong Poison


Civil Society

“Civil Society”—a complex welter of intermediate institutions, including businesses, voluntary associations, educational institutions, clubs, unions, media, charities, and churches—builds, in turn, on the family, the primary instrument by which people are socialized into their culture and given the skills that allow them to live in broader society and through which the values and knowledge of that society are transmitted across the generations.
Francis Fukuyama, Trust


Hugo on Genius

“Tear down theory, poetic systems... No more rules, no more models... Genius conjures up rather than learns... ” —Victor Hugo
César Graña, Bohemian versus Bourgeois


Education

“We have met with families in which for weeks together, not an article of sustenance but potatoes had been used; yet for every child the hard-earned sum was provided to send them to school.”
E. G. West, Education and the State


Faith & Purpose

“When we began first to preach these things, the people appeared as awakened from the sleep of ages—they seemed to see for the first time that they were responsible beings, and that a refusal to use the means appointed was a damning sin.”
Finke, Stark, The Churching of America, 1776-1990


Conversion

“When we received Christ,” Phil added, “all of a sudden we now had a rule book to go by, and when we had problems the preacher was right there to give us the answers.”
James M. Ault, Jr., Spirit and Flesh


Postmodernism

A writer who says that there are no truths, or that all truth is ’merely relative’, is asking you not to believe him. So don’t.
Roger Scruton, Modern Philosophy


Faith and Politics

As far as the Catholic Church is concerned, the principal focus of her interventions in the public arena is the protection and promotion of the dignity of the person, and she is thereby consciously drawing particular attention to principles which are not negotiable... [1.] protection of life in all its stages, from the first moment of conception until natural death; [2.] recognition and promotion of the natural structure of the family... [3.] the protection of the right of parents to educate their children.
Pope Benedict XVI, Speech to European Peoples Party, 2006


China and Christianity

At first, we thought [the power of the West] was because you had more powerful guns than we had. Then we thought it was because you had the best political system. Next we focused on your economic system. But in the past twenty years, we have realized that the heart of your culture is your religion: Christianity.
David Aikman, Jesus in Beijing


Religion, Property, and Family

But the only religions that have survived are those which support property and the family. Thus the outlook for communism, which is both anti-property and anti-family, (and also anti-religion), is not promising.
F.A. Hayek, The Fatal Conceit


Conservatism

Conservatism is the philosophy of society. Its ethic is fraternity and its characteristic is authority — the non-coercive social persuasion which operates in a family or a community. It says ‘we should...’.
Danny Kruger, On Fraternity


US Life in 1842

Families helped each other putting up homes and barns. Together, they built churches, schools, and common civic buildings. They collaborated to build roads and bridges. They took pride in being free persons, independent, and self-reliant; but the texture of their lives was cooperative and fraternal.
Michael Novak, The Spirit of Democratic Capitalism


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©2012 Christopher Chantrill