home  |  book  |  blogs  |   RSS  |  contact  |
  An American Manifesto
Wednesday July 30, 2014 
by Christopher Chantrill Follow chrischantrill on Twitter

TOP NAV

Home

Blogs

Opeds

Articles

Bio

Contact

BOOK

Manifesto

Sample

Faith

Education

Mutual aid

Law

Books

BLOGS 14

Jul 2014

Jun 2014

May 2014

Apr 2014

Mar 2014

Feb 2014

Jan 2014

BLOGS 13

Dec 2013

Nov 2013

Oct 2013

Sep 2013

Aug 2013

Jul 2013

Jun 2013

May 2013

Apr 2013

Mar 2013

Feb 2013

Jan 2013

BLOGS 12

Dec 2012

Nov 2012

Oct 2012

Sep 2012

Aug 2012

Jul 2012

Jun 2012

May 2012

Apr 2012

Mar 2012

Feb 2012

Jan 2012

BLOGS 11

Dec 2011

Nov 2011

Oct 2011

Sep 2011

Aug 2011

Jul 2011

Jun 2011

May 2011

Apr 2011

Mar 2011

Feb 2011

Jan 2011

BLOGS 10

Dec 2010

Nov 2010

Oct 2010

Sep 2010

Aug 2010

Jul 2010

Jun 2010

May 2010

Apr 2010

Mar 2010

Feb 2010

Jan 2010

BLOGS 09

Dec 2009

Nov 2009

Oct 2009

Sep 2009

Aug 2009

Jul 2009

Jun 2009

May 2009

Apr 2009

Mar 2009

Feb 2009

Jan 2009

BLOGS 08

Dec 2008

Nov 2008

Oct 2008

Sep 2008

Aug 2008

Jul 2008

Jun 2008

May 2008

Apr 2008

Mar 2008

Feb 2008

Jan 2008

BLOGS 07

Dec 2007

Nov 2007

Oct 2007

Sep 2007

Aug 2007

Jul 2007

Jun 2007

May 2007

Apr 2007

Mar 2007

Feb 2007

Jan 2007

BLOGS 06

Dec 2006

Nov 2006

Oct 2006

Sep 2006

Aug 2006

Jul 2006

Jun 2006

May 2006

Apr 2006

Mar 2006

Feb 2006

Jan 2006

BLOGS 05

Dec 2005

Nov 2005

Oct 2005

Sep 2005

Aug 2005

Jul 2005

Jun 2005

May 2005

Apr 2005

Mar 2005

Feb 2005

Jan 2005

BLOGS 04

Dec 2004

Democrats Thinking Inside the Bubble Taking Responsibility

print view

Conservatism is More Than Growth and Opportunity

by Christopher Chantrill
January 29, 2013 at 12:24 pm

|

PRESIDENT OBAMA either signed conservatism’s death warrant last week, with his second inaugural’s theme of entitlements forever, climate wars forever, and equality forever, or he sent the liberal Army Group A heading for the Caucasus. But don’t worry liberals: the Sixth Army will take care of Reagangrad.

Meanwhile conservatives are starting to organize for 2016: people like Governor Bobby Jindal (R-LA). Stop fussing about inside the Beltway government, he told the Republican National Committee: focus on the big picture of growth and opportunity.

OK, governor, that’s good as far as it goes. But something was missing in your speech. “Growth and opportunity” is boy stuff. Whatever happened to sharing and caring?

Look, I understand that the GOP is the Daddy party and the Democratic Party is the Mommy party. Maybe there is no way that Republicans can win against the equation that caring-and-sharing equals free stuff from the government. At least, not until the money runs out.

It’s genetic. In chimp culture the males take care of the border wars, aka growth and opportunity, and the females take care of the young and the sharing of the food: sharing and caring.

Everything is different now, of course. Why, writes lefty Joan Bakewell, if Jane Austen were rewriting Pride and Prejudice (200 years old this week) she’d have Miss Bingley running a successful business and the five Bennet brothers lining up for jobs with Bingley Corporation. More likely, dear Joan, she would be writing ironical mysteries like P.D. James about establishment hypocrites and the way we live now.

The bigger problem is that most men vote on principle and most women vote for their children. So how does the GOP persuade women that voting for more free stuff is bad for their children?

The answer is that you must change the culture. Everyone thought that it was perfectly OK to enslave people to raise sugar and cotton, until they didn’t. Everyone thought it was OK to bonk the servants (I’m thinking about you, Karl Marx) until they didn’t.

Today everyone thinks it’s OK to tax workers at 25-70 percent of their wages. Everyone thinks it’s OK to terminate millions of in-utero babies each year. Everyone thinks it’s OK to incarcerate children in government child custodial facilities euphemistically called “schools.” Everyone will think that until we change the culture.

When you look at things that way, the future looks daunting. Conservatives don’t get to order the culture around: we don’t run the mainstream media; we don’t run the schools; we “need not apply” to the professoriate. What chance do we have against the liberal culture machine?

But that’s why God invented moral movements. The anti-slavery movement was an embarrassment, until it won. The anti-communists were an embarrassment, until they won. Many Republican politicians experience the pro-life movement as embarrassing. Not to mention the home-school movement and the marriage movement. The powerful people think of them as fringe, as not serious. “The truth is nothing serious is deemed serious in Washington,” says Bobby Jindal.

The truth is that all the great turns in American history have been driven by moral movements. Think of the Great Awakening that riled people up for the American Revolution.

The great untold story of recent America is the conservative movements of rejection. In the late 1960s, after three of their finest stopped assassins’ bullets, liberals started on gun control. Ten years later the NRA had transformed itself from a rifle club into a Second Amendment movement. In 1972 Congress passed the Equal Rights Amendment. Then God created Phyllis Schlafly. In 1973 liberals passed Roe v. Wade; now we have a great pro-life movement. In 2010 liberals passed Obamacare; now we have the Tea Party. Today liberals are trying to end marriage as we know it with gay marriage at bat and polyamory on deck. Who knows what the pro-marriage movement will look like in 20 years?

They say that President Obama aims to destroy the Republican Party. So what does this political genius do? He picks a big fight on gun control, after riling up the Catholics last year with mandatory contraception coverage for Catholic non-profits.

The big difference between Democrats and Republicans is that Democrats do top-down astroturf movements, fake rent-a-mobs riled up by community organizers and the professional left. But you never know what the conservative grass-roots, usually led by women, will come up with next.

It’s easy for a conservative to be discouraged right now, because our effort to reform the welfare state has failed. But all that proves is that the future will be “interesting.” Don’t forget that while we sit around complaining about the failings of the Romneys and the Boehners and the next crop of presidential candidates, there are genuine conservative movements of rejection quietly organizing and building. And they ain’t going away.

Christopher Chantrill blogs at www.roadtothemiddleclass.com.

Buy his Road to the Middle Class.

print view

To comment on this article at American Thinker click here.

To email the author, click here.

 

 TAGS


What Liberals Think About Conservatives

[W]hen I asked a liberal longtime editor I know with a mainstream [publishing] house for a candid, shorthand version of the assumptions she and her colleagues make about conservatives, she didn't hesitate. “Racist, sexist, homophobic, anti-choice fascists,” she offered, smiling but meaning it.
Harry Stein, I Can't Believe I'm Sitting Next to a Republican


US Life in 1842

Families helped each other putting up homes and barns. Together, they built churches, schools, and common civic buildings. They collaborated to build roads and bridges. They took pride in being free persons, independent, and self-reliant; but the texture of their lives was cooperative and fraternal.
Michael Novak, The Spirit of Democratic Capitalism


Taking Responsibility

[To make] of each individual member of the army a soldier who, in character, capability, and knowledge, is self-reliant, self-confident, dedicated, and joyful in taking responsibility [verantwortungsfreudig] as a man and a soldier. — Gen. Hans von Seeckt
MacGregor Knox, Williamson Murray, ed., The dynamics of military revolution, 1300-2050


Society and State

For [the left] there is only the state and the individual, nothing in between. No family to rely on, no friend to depend on, no community to call on. No neighbourhood to grow in, no faith to share in, no charities to work in. No-one but the Minister, nowhere but Whitehall, no such thing as society - just them, and their laws, and their rules, and their arrogance.
David Cameron, Conference Speech 2008


Socialism equals Animism

Imagining that all order is the result of design, socialists conclude that order must be improvable by better design of some superior mind.
F.A. Hayek, The Fatal Conceit


Sacrifice

[Every] sacrifice is an act of impurity that pays for a prior act of greater impurity... without its participants having to suffer the full consequences incurred by its predecessor. The punishment is commuted in a process that strangely combines and finesses the deep contradiction between justice and mercy.
Frederick Turner, Beauty: The Value of Values


Responsible Self

[The Axial Age] highlights the conception of a responsible self... [that] promise[s] man for the first time that he can understand the fundamental structure of reality and through salvation participate actively in it.
Robert N Bellah, "Religious Evolution", American Sociological Review, Vol. 29, No. 3.


Religion, Property, and Family

But the only religions that have survived are those which support property and the family. Thus the outlook for communism, which is both anti-property and anti-family, (and also anti-religion), is not promising.
F.A. Hayek, The Fatal Conceit


Racial Discrimination

[T]he way “to achieve a system of determining admission to the public schools on a nonracial basis,” Brown II, 349 U. S., at 300–301, is to stop assigning students on a racial basis. The way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to stop discriminating on the basis of race.
Roberts, C.J., Parents Involved in Community Schools vs. Seattle School District


Postmodernism

A writer who says that there are no truths, or that all truth is ’merely relative’, is asking you not to believe him. So don’t.
Roger Scruton, Modern Philosophy


Physics, Religion, and Psychology

Paul Dirac: “When I was talking with Lemaître about [the expanding universe] and feeling stimulated by the grandeur of the picture that he has given us, I told him that I thought cosmology was the branch of science that lies closest to religion. However [Georges] Lemaître [Catholic priest, physicist, and inventor of the Big Bang Theory] did not agree with me. After thinking it over he suggested psychology as lying closest to religion.”
John Farrell, “The Creation Myth”


Pentecostalism

Within Pentecostalism the injurious hierarchies of the wider world are abrogated and replaced by a single hierarchy of faith, grace, and the empowerments of the spirit... where groups gather on rafts to take them through the turbulence of the great journey from extensive rural networks to the mega-city and the nuclear family...
David Martin, On Secularization


mysql close

 

©2012 Christopher Chantrill