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  An American Manifesto
Thursday August 21, 2014 
by Christopher Chantrill Follow chrischantrill on Twitter

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A Road to the Middle Class Special Feature:

Take the Test!

Here at www.roadtothemiddleclass.com we invite you to test your knowledge and understanding of the Road to the Middle Class. When was it built? How long is it? Where does it lead? Who is trying to wreck it? These are tough questions, but you may already know the answers!

So read each question, select your answer, and click the “Answers” button at the end of the test to display the answers and to find out how much you know. The questions that you missed will be helpfully displayed in red.

Part 1: Religion in America

1. Back in 1776, at the time of the Declaration of Independence, what percentage of colonial North Americans adhered to a church?
17% 39% 62% 86% Donīt know

2. In 1980, the year Ronald Reagan was elected president of the United States, what percentage of US residents adhered to a church?
17% 39% 62% 86% Donīt know

3. Where was the first Catholic Archbishop of New York born?
Boston Poland Italy Ireland Donīt know

4. How often does a Pentecostal church open in New York City?
one/week one/month one/year one/decade Donīt know

Part 2: Education in America

5. Back in 1850, as the common school system was spreading across the United States under the inspiration of Horace Mann, what percentage of Americans were literate?
15% 32% 55% 90% Donīt know

6. What was Horace Mannīs most extravagant claim for public education related to?
literacy economic growth crime immigrants Donīt know

7. After 170 years of public schooling in America, what percentage of adult Americans have trouble reading a bus schedule or filling out a job application form?
7% 15% 20% 37% Donīt know

8. What is the central idea in public education?
skills creativity socialization compulsion Donīt know

Part 3: Mutual Aid in America

9. Before the New Deal, how many working-class Americans belonged to fraternal associations?
23% 48% 55% 72% Donīt know

10. Which fraternal assocation uses the symbol of three intertwined loops?
Masons Elks Moose Oddfellows Donīt know

11. When was the first Oddfellows lodge founded?
1787 1805 1819 1867 Donīt know

12. In the spirit of the times, fraternal associations in the nineteenth century were segregated every which way. In what way were they notably not segregated?
class gender race religion Donīt know

Part 4: Living Under Law in America

13. Who was it that wrote: “we may say that the movement of the progressive societies has hitherto been a movement from Status to Contract?”
John Dewey Abraham Lincoln Walter Lippmann
Henry Maine Donīt know

14. Before the founding of the United States, there was Venice, a commercial republic. By what means was the Doge of Venice chosen?
election seize power committee inherit Donīt know

15. Why did the American farmers and miners get their living law incorporated into federal statute law?
they wrote it down they were white males they had guns
they bought Congress Donīt know

16. Why was Tammany Hall so eager to help immigrants? What did Tammany want in return?
contributions votes street fighters respect Donīt know



 

 TAGS


What Liberals Think About Conservatives

[W]hen I asked a liberal longtime editor I know with a mainstream [publishing] house for a candid, shorthand version of the assumptions she and her colleagues make about conservatives, she didn't hesitate. “Racist, sexist, homophobic, anti-choice fascists,” she offered, smiling but meaning it.
Harry Stein, I Can't Believe I'm Sitting Next to a Republican


US Life in 1842

Families helped each other putting up homes and barns. Together, they built churches, schools, and common civic buildings. They collaborated to build roads and bridges. They took pride in being free persons, independent, and self-reliant; but the texture of their lives was cooperative and fraternal.
Michael Novak, The Spirit of Democratic Capitalism


Taking Responsibility

[To make] of each individual member of the army a soldier who, in character, capability, and knowledge, is self-reliant, self-confident, dedicated, and joyful in taking responsibility [verantwortungsfreudig] as a man and a soldier. — Gen. Hans von Seeckt
MacGregor Knox, Williamson Murray, ed., The dynamics of military revolution, 1300-2050


Society and State

For [the left] there is only the state and the individual, nothing in between. No family to rely on, no friend to depend on, no community to call on. No neighbourhood to grow in, no faith to share in, no charities to work in. No-one but the Minister, nowhere but Whitehall, no such thing as society - just them, and their laws, and their rules, and their arrogance.
David Cameron, Conference Speech 2008


Socialism equals Animism

Imagining that all order is the result of design, socialists conclude that order must be improvable by better design of some superior mind.
F.A. Hayek, The Fatal Conceit


Sacrifice

[Every] sacrifice is an act of impurity that pays for a prior act of greater impurity... without its participants having to suffer the full consequences incurred by its predecessor. The punishment is commuted in a process that strangely combines and finesses the deep contradiction between justice and mercy.
Frederick Turner, Beauty: The Value of Values


Responsible Self

[The Axial Age] highlights the conception of a responsible self... [that] promise[s] man for the first time that he can understand the fundamental structure of reality and through salvation participate actively in it.
Robert N Bellah, "Religious Evolution", American Sociological Review, Vol. 29, No. 3.


Religion, Property, and Family

But the only religions that have survived are those which support property and the family. Thus the outlook for communism, which is both anti-property and anti-family, (and also anti-religion), is not promising.
F.A. Hayek, The Fatal Conceit


Racial Discrimination

[T]he way “to achieve a system of determining admission to the public schools on a nonracial basis,” Brown II, 349 U. S., at 300–301, is to stop assigning students on a racial basis. The way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to stop discriminating on the basis of race.
Roberts, C.J., Parents Involved in Community Schools vs. Seattle School District


Postmodernism

A writer who says that there are no truths, or that all truth is ’merely relative’, is asking you not to believe him. So don’t.
Roger Scruton, Modern Philosophy